Goodbye Aberration: Physicist Solves 2,000-Year-Old Optical Problem

Goodbye Aberration: Physicist Solves 2,000-Year-Old Optical Problem

When you look through your viewfinder and things seem a little bit blurry or lacking definition, it’s probably because you are using an “el cheapo” lens.

Source: petapixel.com/2019/07/05/goodbye-aberration-physicist-solves-2000-year-old-optical-problem/

Goodbye Aberration: Physicist Solves 2,000-Year-Old Optical Problem When you look through your viewfinder and things seem a little bit blurry or lacking definition, it’s probably because you are using an “el cheapo” lens. Source: petapixel.com/2019/07/05/goodbye-aberration-physicist-solves-2000-year-old-optical-problem/

Montage – Image Mosaic Software for Astronomers

 

Montage – Image Mosaic Software for Astronomers

Montage is a toolkit for assembling Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) images into custom mosaics. Key features for end users are:

Source: montage.ipac.caltech.edu/

  Montage – Image Mosaic Software for Astronomers Montage is a toolkit for assembling Flexible Image Transport System (FITS) images into custom mosaics. Key features for end users are: Source: montage.ipac.caltech.edu/

Sony’s Next Full-Frame Sensor to Offer 60MP, 8K, 16-Bit RAW: Report

Sony’s Next Full-Frame Sensor to Offer 60MP, 8K, 16-Bit RAW

Sony’s Next Full-Frame Sensor to Offer 60MP, 8K, 16-Bit RAW: Report

Here’s a peek of what’s to come in the camera industry: Sony is reportedly getting ready to announce two new full-frame sensors, one of which will be

Source: petapixel.com/2018/11/26/sonys-next-full-frame-sensor-to-offer-60mp-and-8k-report/?fbclid=IwAR2us4IWJIbC6DVSn-kmcAPlyVZdnu1hykDTdKPbXuSaoh5AdC9OImbWhTQ

Sony’s Next Full-Frame Sensor to Offer 60MP, 8K, 16-Bit RAW Sony’s Next Full-Frame Sensor to Offer 60MP, 8K, 16-Bit RAW: Report Here’s a peek of what’s to come in the camera industry: Sony is reportedly getting ready to announce two new full-frame sensors, one of which will be Source: petapixel.com/2018/11/26/sonys-next-full-frame-sensor-to-offer-60mp-and-8k-report/?fbclid=IwAR2us4IWJIbC6DVSn-kmcAPlyVZdnu1hykDTdKPbXuSaoh5AdC9OImbWhTQ

Testing ON1 Photo RAW for Astrophotography

 

Testing ON1 Photo RAW for Astrophotography

Can the new version of ON1 Photo RAW match Photoshop for astrophotography?  The short TL;DR answer: No. But … as always, it depends. So do read on. Released in mid-November 2018, the latest v…

Source: amazingsky.net/2018/11/22/testing-on1-photo-raw-for-astrophotography/

  Testing ON1 Photo RAW for Astrophotography Can the new version of ON1 Photo RAW match Photoshop for astrophotography?  The short TL;DR answer: No. But … as always, it depends. So do read on. Released in mid-November 2018, the latest v… Source: amazingsky.net/2018/11/22/testing-on1-photo-raw-for-astrophotography/

Testing the Sony a7III for Astrophotography

Testing the Sony a7III for Astrophotography

Testing the Sony a7III for Astrophotography

I put the new Sony a7III mirrorless camera through its paces for the features and functions we need to shoot the night sky. Sony’s a7III camera has enjoyed rave reviews since its introduction earli…

Source: amazingsky.net/2018/05/31/testing-the-sony-a7iii-for-astrophotography/

Testing the Sony a7III for Astrophotography Testing the Sony a7III for Astrophotography I put the new Sony a7III mirrorless camera through its paces for the features and functions we need to shoot the night sky. Sony’s a7III camera has enjoyed rave reviews since its introduction earli… Source: amazingsky.net/2018/05/31/testing-the-sony-a7iii-for-astrophotography/

Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography

New: Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography | Nikon Rumors

New: Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography | Nikon Rumors

 

The first Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography is now available for sale – a company converts a regular Nikon D850 to an Astro D850. The price is $4,950 ($1,650 over the regular D850 price of 3,296). To achieve effective cooling, they actually moved the sensor outside of the camera and performed several other

Source: nikonrumors.com/2018/05/27/new-nikon-d850-cooled-camera-for-astrophotography.aspx/

New: Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography | Nikon Rumors New: Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography | Nikon Rumors   The first Nikon D850 cooled camera for astrophotography is now available for sale – a company converts a regular Nikon D850 to an Astro D850. The price is $4,950 Continue Reading

How Juno’s Breathtaking Jupiter Images Are Made

How Juno’s Breathtaking Jupiter Images Are Made

Jupiter’s sandy swirls and blue-hued poles are visible even from Earth. But the Juno spacecraft’s crisp and colourful images begin as warped and dull raw files. The fantastic finished visuals are the result of enthusiastic amateur astronomers, software developers, and artists communicating over message boards. They work together to turn the raw images into accurate art for the space-loving public.

“Image processing is a creative process,” visual artist Seán Doran, who has made a number of the most familiar Jovian images, told Gizmodo. “Every Juno picture is unique and demands a slightly modified approach for each.”

The Juno spacecraft is a basketball court-sized, turbine-shaped probe that left Earth in 2011, flew by again in 2013 for a gravitational assist, and arrived at Jupiter in 2016. Its many instruments have demonstrated that Jupiter is far stranger than astronomers ever could have imagined. But one of its instruments, JunoCam, isn’t really intended for scientists. It’s for amateurs like us.

More: gizmodo.com/how-junos-breathtaking-jupiter-images-are-made-1825369932

How Juno’s Breathtaking Jupiter Images Are Made Jupiter’s sandy swirls and blue-hued poles are visible even from Earth. But the Juno spacecraft’s crisp and colourful images begin as warped and dull raw files. The fantastic finished visuals are the result of enthusiastic amateur astronomers, software developers, and artists communicating over Continue Reading

CCD versus CMOS: Which is Better?

Great explanation – make sure you click through the link and read the entire article!

CCD versus CMOS: Which is Better? – Diffraction Limited

We’re often asked whether CMOS or CCD sensors are better.  The simple answer is, “it depends.”

Both types of sensors detect light the exact same way.  An incoming photon hits an atom of silicon, which is a semiconductor.  When this happens one of the electrons in the atom is boosted to a higher energy level (orbital), referred to as the conduction band.  Silicon normally behaves like an insulator, so its electrons can’t move around.  But once an electron is boosted up to the conduction band, it is freed to move around to other adjacent atoms, as if the silicon was a metal.  What was an insulator becomes a conductor – this is why silicon is called a semiconductor.  In optical sensors these now-mobile electrons are referred to as photoelectrons.

Both types of sensors use pixels.  Pixels are simply a tiny square region of silicon, which collect and hold these photoelectrons.  The usual analogy is an array of rain buckets in a field, each collecting rain water.  If you want to know how much it rained in any part of the field, you just have to measure how full each bucket is.  So far everything is the same for CCD and CMOS; it’s the measuring process where things are very different.

More diffractionlimited.com/ccd-versus-cmos-better/

Great explanation – make sure you click through the link and read the entire article! CCD versus CMOS: Which is Better? – Diffraction Limited We’re often asked whether CMOS or CCD sensors are better.  The simple answer is, “it depends.” Both types of sensors detect light the exact same way.  Continue Reading

How to Focus for Night Photography

One of the biggest challenges I faced when I first became interested in night photography was getting my images in focus. I would take shot after shot each time adjusting my focus using trial and error till I got it right. Thank goodness there’s a better way! Now there’s a few different methods that I’ll lay out here but I really only use one. So we’re going to start with that. 1. Live View The main issue when shooting at night is that its dark. And with that most obvious statement I hope you keep reading. But seriously you’d think using live view wouldn’t help at all. But it does. So what I do is open up live view mode. Then point your camera towards the brightest star in the sky. You should be able to see faint little stars in your lcd screen. Using the camera’s digital magnification, zoom in on the brightest one and then manually focus your lens until that star becomes a fine point. If you’re unable to see the stars in your live view screen then try finding a distant cell tower. If there isn’t a light bright enough then take a flashlight and carry it off a ways until you’re past your lens’ focal range. Then shine it on something like a tree or your friend or whatever. Now manually focus your lens on that. Most wide angle lenses have a relatively short focal range until they just set at infinity. 30 feet should be about right but check your lens specifications to determine what it’s maximum focal distance is until it gets to infinity. Ultimately you want your lens to focus at infinity. This will ensure that your stars are nice and sharp. Be careful though that there aren’t a lot of close objects in your forground because they might not appear in focus once you take the shot. Like I said, this is the method that I usually use and it works well. 2. Painter’s Tape. This method is simpler but I don’t like to use it. Pretty much all you do is take your lens out during the day and focus on a distant object to get it to infinity. Then turn your focus to manual. Now take a piece of painter’s tape and put it across your focus ring so that it won’t move. Now when you go out at night your lens is already focused and ready to go. Simple. But I prefer not to use this method because it’s most likely that I’ll be using that lens all the way up until it gets dark. But if you’re not planning on using that lens go for it! 3. Infinity on the Focus Ring. This is my least favorite method. But others use it and like it so I’ll go ahead and tell you about it. On some lenses like the Tokina 11-16 for APS-C or the Canon 16-35 for full frame or crop you can actually see the focus ring. On these lenses you can simply turn your focus ring to infinity. Simple as that. On others that don’t have a visible focus ring like the Canon 24mm 2.8, which is actually one of my favorite lenses for night photos, it’s a little more of a guess. On lenses like this you pretty much just need to know where infinity is by turning your focus all the way. Not very reliable really. This method is probably the least reliable. Besides, depending on conditions infinity might not be the same for every photo. Watch the tutorial below and be sure to check out my other article Basic Settings for Night Photography and get out there and start shooting some stars! https://youtu.be/H1AkpseOe_Q

Source: www.findmeonthemountain.com/how-to-focus-for-night-photography

One of the biggest challenges I faced when I first became interested in night photography was getting my images in focus. I would take shot after shot each time adjusting my focus using trial and error till I got it right. Thank goodness there’s a better way! Now there’s a Continue Reading

The benefits of adding more subs to your stack

A good guide about the advantages of image stacking for DSLR astrophotography 

 

The benefits of adding more subs to your stack

Adding multiple exposures to create a single image is one of the key elements of doing astrophotography. It enables us to get rid of bad pixels, satellite trails, noise while increasing signal to increase the overall signal-to-noise ratio. It truly is one of the most important aspects of astrophotography. But stacking remains a bit of a mystery to most people and they will keep having questions like ‘How many frames should I stack?’, ‘Am I …

Source: dslr-astrophotography.com/benefits-adding-frames-stack/

A good guide about the advantages of image stacking for DSLR astrophotography    The benefits of adding more subs to your stack Adding multiple exposures to create a single image is one of the key elements of doing astrophotography. It enables us to get rid of bad pixels, satellite trails, Continue Reading

M31 pic

It’s a hot, rainy Saturday afternoon in Sydney so what the hell, there’s an old pic of M31 I took some time ago. 

It’s a hot, rainy Saturday afternoon in Sydney so what the hell, there’s an old pic of M31 I took some time ago. 

Sensor breakthrough: Sony has developed a backlit CMOS sensor with global shutter

This s very cool! Sony has just announced a CMOS chip that can read all the pixels at once – plus is has  large 3 micron pixel size which will see it became a favourite for planetary imaging I’m sure!

Sony has made something of a break-through in sensor development with a new backside-illuminated CMOS sensor that is capable of global shutter, a huge improvement over current CMOS global shutter technology.

Source: www.dpreview.com/news/1945724359/sensor-breakthrough-sony-has-developed-a-backlit-cmos-sensor-with-global-shutter

This s very cool! Sony has just announced a CMOS chip that can read all the pixels at once – plus is has  large 3 micron pixel size which will see it became a favourite for planetary imaging I’m sure! Sony has made something of a break-through in sensor development Continue Reading

CCD vs CMOS | Teledyne DALSA

 

CCD vs CMOS | Teledyne DALSA

Another interesting read on CCD vs CMOS

Much has been written about the relative advantages of CMOS versus CCD imagers. It seems that the debate has continued on for as long as most people can remember with no definitive conclusion in sight. It is not surprising that a definitive answer is elusive, since the topic is not static. Technologies and markets evolve, affecting not only what is technically feasible, but also what is commercially viable. Imager applications are varied, with different and changing requirements. Some applications are best served by CMOS imagers, some by CCDs. In this article, we will attempt to add some clarity to the discussion by examining the different situations, explaining some of the lesser known technical trade-offs, and introducing cost considerations into the picture.

  CCD vs CMOS | Teledyne DALSA Another interesting read on CCD vs CMOS Much has been written about the relative advantages of CMOS versus CCD imagers. It seems that the debate has continued on for as long as most people can remember with no definitive conclusion in sight. It Continue Reading

Should You Get a Colour or Monochrome Camera? • PhotographingSpace.com

A good read on colour vs mono astronomy cameras

Should You Get a Colour or Monochrome Camera? • PhotographingSpace.com

Why on earth would you ever choose a monochrome camera for astrophotography when there is so much beautiful color in the universe?!

Source: photographingspace.com/colour-vs-mono-camera/

A good read on colour vs mono astronomy cameras Should You Get a Colour or Monochrome Camera? • PhotographingSpace.com Why on earth would you ever choose a monochrome camera for astrophotography when there is so much beautiful color in the universe?! Source: photographingspace.com/colour-vs-mono-camera/