Stream 47 Hours of Classic Sci-Fi Novels & Stories: Asimov, Wells, Orwell, Verne, Lovecraft & More

 

Stream 47 Hours of Classic Sci-Fi Novels & Stories: Asimov, Wells, Orwell, Verne, Lovecraft & More

Some very cool listening!

 

  Stream 47 Hours of Classic Sci-Fi Novels & Stories: Asimov, Wells, Orwell, Verne, Lovecraft & More Some very cool listening!   Source: www.openculture.com/2018/04/stream-47-hours-of-classic-sci-fi-novels-stories-asimov-wells-orwell-verne-lovecraft-more.html

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space

When you think about what’s out there in the abyss of deep space, whether you’re looking out at the planets in our Solar System or the most distant galaxies perceptible in the Universe, the instrument most people think about using for the best images and data is the Hubble Space Telescope. Perched hundreds of miles above the Earth’s atmosphere, issues like clouds, atmospheric distortion, turbulent air, or even pollution are no concern. Images are as sharp as the cameras and optics on board allow, and from its position off-world, it can look in any direction we want it to. Using it, we’ve seen wonders the likes of which we’ve never imagined; Hubble has shown us what the Universe truly looks like.

Source: www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2018/03/22/5-reasons-why-astronomy-is-better-from-the-ground-than-in-space/

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space When you think about what’s out there in the abyss of deep space, whether you’re looking out at the planets in our Solar System or the most distant galaxies perceptible in the Universe, the instrument most people think Continue Reading

This Smart Telescope for Newbies Looks Like a Sci-Fi Space Robot

Cool idea, but a lot of money for an 80mm refractor. 

This Smart Telescope for Newbies Looks Like a Sci-Fi Space Robot

A new app-enabled telescope makes stargazing and astrophotography easier than ever.

Source: www.space.com/40151-stellina-smart-telescope.html

Cool idea, but a lot of money for an 80mm refractor.  This Smart Telescope for Newbies Looks Like a Sci-Fi Space Robot A new app-enabled telescope makes stargazing and astrophotography easier than ever. Source: www.space.com/40151-stellina-smart-telescope.html

ESA Science & Technology: Explore the cosmos with ESASky

ESA Science & Technology: Explore the cosmos with ESASky

Meet ESASky, a discovery portal that provides full access to the entire sky. This open-science application allows computer, tablet and mobile users to visualise cosmic objects near and far across the electromagnetic spectrum.

Source: sci.esa.int/astrophysics/60099-explore-the-cosmos-with-esasky/

ESA Science & Technology: Explore the cosmos with ESASky Meet ESASky, a discovery portal that provides full access to the entire sky. This open-science application allows computer, tablet and mobile users to visualise cosmic objects near and far across the electromagnetic spectrum. Source: sci.esa.int/astrophysics/60099-explore-the-cosmos-with-esasky/

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space

When you think about what’s out there in the abyss of deep space, whether you’re looking out at the planets in our Solar System or the most distant galaxies perceptible in the Universe, the instrument most people think about using for the best images and data is the Hubble Space Telescope. Perched hundreds of miles above the Earth’s atmosphere, issues like clouds, atmospheric distortion, turbulent air, or even pollution are no concern. Images are as sharp as the cameras and optics on board allow, and from its position off-world, it can look in any direction we want it to. Using it, we’ve seen wonders the likes of which we’ve never imagined; Hubble has shown us what the Universe truly looks like.

And yet, there are things we can do from the ground that are indisputably superior to anything we can do from space. There are images we can create and data we can collect that are simply impossible to do from space. Whether we’re using ground-based telescopes, balloon-borne observatories or even a high-altitude aircraft, there are many good reasons to remain here on Earth. Sure, flying above the atmosphere and receiving the omnidirectional perspective that going to space gives you are definite victories for the space telescope aficionados; there’s no way adaptive optics or a pristine observing site can compete with an observatory that doesn’t have the Earth to contend with. But there are some very compelling reasons to do astronomy on the ground, as there are benefits that you lose the instant you go to space. Here are the top five:

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space When you think about what’s out there in the abyss of deep space, whether you’re looking out at the planets in our Solar System or the most distant galaxies perceptible in the Universe, the instrument most people think Continue Reading

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope

Source: boingboing.net/2018/03/15/watch-people-react-to-lookin.html

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope Source: boingboing.net/2018/03/15/watch-people-react-to-lookin.html

Astronomers detect light from the Universe’s first stars

Via a radio telescope in Western Australia!

Astronomers detect light from the Universe’s first stars

 

Surprises in signal from cosmic dawn also hint at presence of dark matter.

Astronomers have for the first time spotted long-sought signals of light from the earliest stars ever to form in the Universe — around 180 million years after the Big Bang.

The signal is a fingerprint left on background radiation by hydrogen that absorbed some of this primordial light. The evidence hints that the gas that made up the early Universe was colder than predicted. This, physicists say, is a possible sign of dark matter’s influence. If confirmed, the discovery could mark the first time that dark matter has been detected through anything other than its gravitational effects.

Source: www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-02616-8

Via a radio telescope in Western Australia! Astronomers detect light from the Universe’s first stars   Surprises in signal from cosmic dawn also hint at presence of dark matter. Astronomers have for the first time spotted long-sought signals of light from the earliest stars ever to form in the Universe Continue Reading

Researchers Propose Low-Mass Supernova Triggered Formation of Solar System

So what caused the formation of the Solar System? One possibility is the shock from a low mass Supernova explosion.

Researchers Propose Low-Mass Supernova Triggered Formation of Solar System

A research team led by University of Minnesota School of Physics and Astronomy Professor Yong-Zhong Qian uses new models and evidence from meteorites to show that a low-mass supernova triggered the formation of our solar system. The findings are published in the most recent issue of Nature Communications, a leading scientific journal.

Source: www.astrowatch.net/2016/11/researchers-propose-low-mass-supernova.html

So what caused the formation of the Solar System? One possibility is the shock from a low mass Supernova explosion. Researchers Propose Low-Mass Supernova Triggered Formation of Solar System A research team led by University of Minnesota School of Physics and Astronomy Professor Yong-Zhong Qian uses new models and evidence Continue Reading

Earth’s carbon points to planetary smashup

Further evidence about the Earth being struck by a large, Mercury size object in the early life of the Solar System

Research by Rice University Earth scientists suggests that virtually all of Earth’s life-giving carbon could have come from a collision about 4.4 billion years ago between Earth and an embryonic planet similar to Mercury.

In a new study this week in Nature Geoscience, Rice petrologist Rajdeep Dasgupta and colleagues offer a new answer to a long-debated geological question: How did carbon-based life develop on Earth, given that most of the planet’s carbon should have either boiled away in the planet’s earliest days or become locked in Earth’s ?

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2016-09-earth-carbon-planetary-smashup.html

 

400 Bad request

Further evidence about the Earth being struck by a large, Mercury size object in the early life of the Solar System Research by Rice University Earth scientists suggests that virtually all of Earth’s life-giving carbon could have come from a collision about 4.4 billion years ago between Earth and an Continue Reading

MAVEN Reveals Speed of Solar Wind Stripping Martian Atmosphere

The MAVEN mission has identified the process that appears to have played a key role in the transition of the Martian climate from an early, warm and wet environment that might have supported surface life to the cold, arid planet Mars is today.

MAVEN » MAVEN Reveals Speed of Solar Wind Stripping Martian Atmosphere

 

An artist’s rendition depicts a solar storm hitting Mars and stripping ions from the upper atmosphere. (Courtesy NASA GSFC)

Source: lasp.colorado.edu/home/maven/2015/11/05/maven-reveals-speed-of-solar-wind-stripping-martian-atmosphere/

The MAVEN mission has identified the process that appears to have played a key role in the transition of the Martian climate from an early, warm and wet environment that might have supported surface life to the cold, arid planet Mars is today. MAVEN » MAVEN Reveals Speed of Solar Continue Reading

Irregular dimming of a young stellar object investigated by astronomers

More irregular dimming. Another Tabbi’s Star? 

New research conducted by a team of astronomers, led by Simone Scaringi of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, examines peculiar dimming of a newly found young stellar object designated EPIC 204278916. The study tries to explain the nature of these dipping events observed in the object’s light curve. The results were published Aug. 25 in a paper available on arXiv.org.

https://phys.org/news/2016-08-irregular-dimming-young-stellar-astronomers.html

 

400 Bad request

More irregular dimming. Another Tabbi’s Star?  New research conducted by a team of astronomers, led by Simone Scaringi of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, examines peculiar dimming of a newly found young stellar object designated EPIC 204278916. The study tries to explain the nature of these Continue Reading

Gemini Planet Imager First Light!

Gemini Planet Imager First Light!

Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) was designed, built, and optimized for imaging faint planets next to bright stars and probing their atmospheres. It will also be a powerful tool for studying dusty, planet-forming disks around young stars. It is the most advanced such instrument to be deployed on the 8-meter Gemini South telescope in Chile.

Source: www.gemini.edu/node/12113

Gemini Planet Imager First Light! Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) was designed, built, and optimized for imaging faint planets next to bright stars and probing their atmospheres. It will also be a powerful tool for studying dusty, planet-forming disks around young stars. It is the most advanced such instrument to be Continue Reading

Water found in stardust suggests life is universal

Water found in stardust suggests life is universal

Pockets of water have been detected in dust from our solar system – suggesting that life’s ingredients may be spread across the universe

Source: www.newscientist.com/article/dn24907-water-found-in-stardust-suggests-life-is-universal

Water found in stardust suggests life is universal Pockets of water have been detected in dust from our solar system – suggesting that life’s ingredients may be spread across the universe Source: www.newscientist.com/article/dn24907-water-found-in-stardust-suggests-life-is-universal

ALMA Spots Supernova Dust Factory

ALMA Spots Supernova Dust Factory

Striking new observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope capture, for the first time, the remains of a recent supernova brimming with freshly formed dust. If enough of this dust makes the perilous transition into interstellar space, it could explain how many galaxies acquired their dusty, dusky appearance.

Source: www.eso.org/public/news/eso1401/

ALMA Spots Supernova Dust Factory Striking new observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) telescope capture, for the first time, the remains of a recent supernova brimming with freshly formed dust. If enough of this dust makes the perilous transition into interstellar space, it could explain how many galaxies Continue Reading