How to Focus for Night Photography

One of the biggest challenges I faced when I first became interested in night photography was getting my images in focus. I would take shot after shot each time adjusting my focus using trial and error till I got it right. Thank goodness there’s a better way! Now there’s a few different methods that I’ll lay out here but I really only use one. So we’re going to start with that. 1. Live View The main issue when shooting at night is that its dark. And with that most obvious statement I hope you keep reading. But seriously you’d think using live view wouldn’t help at all. But it does. So what I do is open up live view mode. Then point your camera towards the brightest star in the sky. You should be able to see faint little stars in your lcd screen. Using the camera’s digital magnification, zoom in on the brightest one and then manually focus your lens until that star becomes a fine point. If you’re unable to see the stars in your live view screen then try finding a distant cell tower. If there isn’t a light bright enough then take a flashlight and carry it off a ways until you’re past your lens’ focal range. Then shine it on something like a tree or your friend or whatever. Now manually focus your lens on that. Most wide angle lenses have a relatively short focal range until they just set at infinity. 30 feet should be about right but check your lens specifications to determine what it’s maximum focal distance is until it gets to infinity. Ultimately you want your lens to focus at infinity. This will ensure that your stars are nice and sharp. Be careful though that there aren’t a lot of close objects in your forground because they might not appear in focus once you take the shot. Like I said, this is the method that I usually use and it works well. 2. Painter’s Tape. This method is simpler but I don’t like to use it. Pretty much all you do is take your lens out during the day and focus on a distant object to get it to infinity. Then turn your focus to manual. Now take a piece of painter’s tape and put it across your focus ring so that it won’t move. Now when you go out at night your lens is already focused and ready to go. Simple. But I prefer not to use this method because it’s most likely that I’ll be using that lens all the way up until it gets dark. But if you’re not planning on using that lens go for it! 3. Infinity on the Focus Ring. This is my least favorite method. But others use it and like it so I’ll go ahead and tell you about it. On some lenses like the Tokina 11-16 for APS-C or the Canon 16-35 for full frame or crop you can actually see the focus ring. On these lenses you can simply turn your focus ring to infinity. Simple as that. On others that don’t have a visible focus ring like the Canon 24mm 2.8, which is actually one of my favorite lenses for night photos, it’s a little more of a guess. On lenses like this you pretty much just need to know where infinity is by turning your focus all the way. Not very reliable really. This method is probably the least reliable. Besides, depending on conditions infinity might not be the same for every photo. Watch the tutorial below and be sure to check out my other article Basic Settings for Night Photography and get out there and start shooting some stars! https://youtu.be/H1AkpseOe_Q

Source: www.findmeonthemountain.com/how-to-focus-for-night-photography

One of the biggest challenges I faced when I first became interested in night photography was getting my images in focus. I would take shot after shot each time adjusting my focus using trial and error till I got it right. Thank goodness there’s a better way! Now there’s a Continue Reading

Defying Theories, This Ghostly Galaxy Has Almost No Dark Matter

Defying Theories, This Ghostly Galaxy Has Almost No Dark Matter

A unique galaxy is making the case for dark matter, even though it has very little of the mysterious substance. Astronomers have determined that the galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, or DF2 for short, has 400 times less dark matter than expected for an object of its size.

In addition to providing insight into how galaxies form, the unusual galaxy is helping strengthen the argument for the existence of dark matter, researchers said.

Source: www.space.com/40119-ghostly-galaxy-almost-no-dark-matter.html

Defying Theories, This Ghostly Galaxy Has Almost No Dark Matter A unique galaxy is making the case for dark matter, even though it has very little of the mysterious substance. Astronomers have determined that the galaxy NGC 1052-DF2, or DF2 for short, has 400 times less dark matter than expected Continue Reading

Physicists at crossroads in trying to understand universe

400 Bad request

​Scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick and elsewhere are at a crossroads in their 50-year quest to go beyond the Standard Model in physics.

Rutgers Today asked professors Sunil Somalwar and Scott Thomas in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the School of Arts and Sciences to discuss mysteries of the universe. Somalwar’s research focuses on experimental elementary particle physics, or high energy physics, which involves smashing particles together at large particle accelerators such as the one at CERN in Switzerland. Thomas’s research focuses on theoretical particle physics.

The duo, who collaborate on experiments, and other Rutgers physicists – including Yuri Gershtein – contributed to the historic 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson, a subatomic particle responsible for the structure of all matter and a key component of the Standard Model.

Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2018-03-physicists-crossroads-universe.html#jCp

400 Bad request ​Scientists at Rutgers University–New Brunswick and elsewhere are at a crossroads in their 50-year quest to go beyond the Standard Model in physics. Rutgers Today asked professors Sunil Somalwar and Scott Thomas in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at the School of Arts and Sciences to discuss mysteries of the Continue Reading

ESA Science & Technology: Explore the cosmos with ESASky

ESA Science & Technology: Explore the cosmos with ESASky

Meet ESASky, a discovery portal that provides full access to the entire sky. This open-science application allows computer, tablet and mobile users to visualise cosmic objects near and far across the electromagnetic spectrum.

Source: sci.esa.int/astrophysics/60099-explore-the-cosmos-with-esasky/

ESA Science & Technology: Explore the cosmos with ESASky Meet ESASky, a discovery portal that provides full access to the entire sky. This open-science application allows computer, tablet and mobile users to visualise cosmic objects near and far across the electromagnetic spectrum. Source: sci.esa.int/astrophysics/60099-explore-the-cosmos-with-esasky/

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space

When you think about what’s out there in the abyss of deep space, whether you’re looking out at the planets in our Solar System or the most distant galaxies perceptible in the Universe, the instrument most people think about using for the best images and data is the Hubble Space Telescope. Perched hundreds of miles above the Earth’s atmosphere, issues like clouds, atmospheric distortion, turbulent air, or even pollution are no concern. Images are as sharp as the cameras and optics on board allow, and from its position off-world, it can look in any direction we want it to. Using it, we’ve seen wonders the likes of which we’ve never imagined; Hubble has shown us what the Universe truly looks like.

And yet, there are things we can do from the ground that are indisputably superior to anything we can do from space. There are images we can create and data we can collect that are simply impossible to do from space. Whether we’re using ground-based telescopes, balloon-borne observatories or even a high-altitude aircraft, there are many good reasons to remain here on Earth. Sure, flying above the atmosphere and receiving the omnidirectional perspective that going to space gives you are definite victories for the space telescope aficionados; there’s no way adaptive optics or a pristine observing site can compete with an observatory that doesn’t have the Earth to contend with. But there are some very compelling reasons to do astronomy on the ground, as there are benefits that you lose the instant you go to space. Here are the top five:

5 Reasons Why Astronomy Is Better From The Ground Than In Space When you think about what’s out there in the abyss of deep space, whether you’re looking out at the planets in our Solar System or the most distant galaxies perceptible in the Universe, the instrument most people think Continue Reading

microprocessors used in spacecrafts – WikiChip

Very interesting read about the microprocessors used in various spacecraft . Throughout the years, microprocessors have played a large role in spacecrafts. space-qualified microprocessors are designed to be exceptionally reliable and highly durable. Due to their unique nature, the same set of chips that have been tested and proven to work are used in many spacecrafts. 

microprocessors used in spacecrafts

 

Very interesting read about the microprocessors used in various spacecraft . Throughout the years, microprocessors have played a large role in spacecrafts. space-qualified microprocessors are designed to be exceptionally reliable and highly durable. Due to their unique nature, the same set of chips that have been tested and proven to work are used in many spacecrafts.  Continue Reading

Incredible High-Definition Pictures Of The Moon’s Surface Released By Chinese Space Agency | Physics-Astronomy

Incredible High-Definition Pictures Of The Moon’s Surface Released By Chinese Space Agency

We’ve become used to looking at unclear images of the Moon’s surface taken about 50 years ago, but the newest collection of photos issued by the Chinese space agency comprise some of the clearest pictures ever taken. These stunning pictures were taken by the Chinese Space Agency’s Yutu lunar rover.

Source: www.physics-astronomy.com/2018/02/incredible-high-definition-pictures-of.html

Incredible High-Definition Pictures Of The Moon’s Surface Released By Chinese Space Agency We’ve become used to looking at unclear images of the Moon’s surface taken about 50 years ago, but the newest collection of photos issued by the Chinese space agency comprise some of the clearest pictures ever taken. These Continue Reading

Astronomers Have Detected the Brightest Fast Radio Burst Ever Seen. Still No Idea What’s Causing Them – Universe Today

Astronomers Have Detected the Brightest Fast Radio Burst Ever Seen. Still No Idea What’s Causing Them – Universe Today

Space and Astronomy news

Source: www.universetoday.com/138807/astronomers-detected-brightest-fast-radio-burst-ever-seen-still-no-idea-whats-causing/

Astronomers Have Detected the Brightest Fast Radio Burst Ever Seen. Still No Idea What’s Causing Them – Universe Today Space and Astronomy news Source: www.universetoday.com/138807/astronomers-detected-brightest-fast-radio-burst-ever-seen-still-no-idea-whats-causing/

Research Blog: Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets

Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets

Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets

Recently, we discovered two exoplanets by training a neural network to analyze data from NASA’s Kepler space telescope and accurately identify the most promising planet signals. And while this was only an initial analysis of ~700 stars, we consider this a successful proof-of-concept for using machine learning to discover exoplanets, and more generally another example of using machine learning to make meaningful gains in a variety of scientific disciplines (e.g. healthcarequantum chemistry, and fusion research).

Today, we’re excited to release our code for processing the Kepler data, training our neural network model, and making predictions about new candidate signals. We hope this release will prove a useful starting point for developing similar models for other NASA missions, like K2 (Kepler’s second mission) and the upcoming Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite mission. As well as announcing the release of our code, we’d also like take this opportunity to dig a bit deeper into how our model works.

Source: research.googleblog.com/2018/03/open-sourcing-hunt-for-exoplanets.html

Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets Open Sourcing the Hunt for Exoplanets Recently, we discovered two exoplanets by training a neural network to analyze data from NASA’s Kepler space telescope and accurately identify the most promising planet signals. And while this was only an initial analysis of ~700 stars, we consider this a successful proof-of-concept for Continue Reading

Rare Metals On Mars And Earth Implicate Colossal Impacts – Astrobiology Magazine

 

Rare Metals On Mars And Earth Implicate Colossal Impacts – Astrobiology Magazine

Elements found in the mantles of Earth and Mars could be indicative of giant impacts early in the histories of both planets.

Source: www.astrobio.net/mars/rare-metals-mars-earth-implicate-colossal-impacts/

  Rare Metals On Mars And Earth Implicate Colossal Impacts – Astrobiology Magazine Elements found in the mantles of Earth and Mars could be indicative of giant impacts early in the histories of both planets. Source: www.astrobio.net/mars/rare-metals-mars-earth-implicate-colossal-impacts/

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope

Source: boingboing.net/2018/03/15/watch-people-react-to-lookin.html

Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope Watch – people react to looking at the moon through a telescope Source: boingboing.net/2018/03/15/watch-people-react-to-lookin.html

All disk galaxies rotate once every billion years

In a study published March 14 in The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, astronomers announced the discovery that all galaxies rotate about once every billion years, no matter their size or mass. 

“It’s not Swiss watch precision,” said Gerhardt Meurer, an astronomer from the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), in a press release. “But regardless of whether a galaxy is very big or very small, if you could sit on the extreme edge of its disk as it spins, it would take you about a billion years to go all the way round.”

“Discovering such regularity in galaxies really helps us to better understand the mechanics that make them tick,” he said. “You won’t find a dense galaxy rotating quickly, while another with the same size but lower density is rotating more slowly.”

To carry out the study, the researchers measured the radial velocities of neutral hydrogen in the outer disks of a plethora of galaxies — ranging from small dwarf irregulars to massive spirals. These galaxies differed in both size and rotational velocity by up to a factor of 30. With these radial velocity measurements, the researchers were able to calculate the rotational period of their sample galaxies, which led them to conclude that the outer rims of all disk galaxies take roughly a billion years to complete one rotation. However, the researchers note that further research is required to confirm the clock-like spin rate is a universal trait of disk galaxies and not just a result of selection bias.   

Source: www.astronomy.com/news/2018/03/all-galaxies-rotate-once-every-billion-years

In a study published March 14 in The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, astronomers announced the discovery that all galaxies rotate about once every billion years, no matter their size or mass.  “It’s not Swiss watch precision,” said Gerhardt Meurer, an astronomer from the International Centre for Radio Continue Reading